GLASS PAINTINGS OF LANDSCAPES, SEASCAPES AND UNDERWATER SCENES


"Auspicious at Midnight"
Kiln-Fired Glass Art Wall Hanging

Dimensions: 20.5" W x 14" H x .25” D
Crane Silhouette in Moonlight and Clouds. A symbolic animal in some Asian cultures, the crane is auspicious in Japanese culture – a good omen conducive to success and long life. In Chinese decorative arts the crane is a also a sign of longevity, and the crane among clouds is a representation for wisdom and nobility.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design during multiple kiln firings onto an iridescent silver-coated black glass. The piece is opaque with a shiny finish on the front surface.

Photograph of glass art by Joey Pena

Not Available



"Tahitian Waters"
Kiln-Fired Glass Art Wall Hanging or Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 20.5” W x 16.5” H x 3/8” D
Overwater Bungalows in Sparkling Tahitian Waters, soft clouds reflecting the brilliant blue of the waters, sunlight glittering on the water and bougainvillea protruding up from the foot of the observation pier. The bougainvillea flowers and leaves are fired onto the foreground on a separate firing at a lower temperature than a “full fuse” so they can remain in relief above the turquois water. The piece is opaque with a shiny finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) and cut pieces of glass were manipulated into the design and kiln-fired during multiple firings onto 2 sheets of glass.

Photograph of glass art by Joey Pena
Displays well on Display Stand # 1, which is available - sold and shipped separately

Available - $4,500.00



“Red Butte”
Kiln-Fired Glass Art Wall Hanging or Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 20.5" W X 16.5" H

Craggy red-orange buttes of Arizona reflecting their brilliant color onto the wind-blown clouds of an azure sky, flanked by green trees and bushes whose contrast serve to accentuate the powerful color of the buttes. The piece is opaque with a shiny finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design and kiln-fired during multiple firings onto 6 sheets of glass, which were then fired together.

Photograph of glass art by Joey Pena
Displays well on Display Stand # 1 

Not Available




“Texas Hill Country Sunset”
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed or Wall Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 10-7/8" W x 7-3/4" H x 1/2” D
The Sunset glowing through Texas live oaks, underbrush and barbed–wire fences. The sunset color is particularly intense with backlighting. This piece is translucent with opaque design and a matte finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design and kiln-fired during multiple firings onto 3 sheets of glass, which were then fired together.

Display Stand # 3 displays it well, and is available - sold and shipped separately.

"Texas Hill Country Sunset" is also available for sale framed and with LED backlighting, allowing the piece to then either stand on a counter or be hung on a wall, having its own lighting adjustable by dimmer switch. Frame with LED back lighting sold separately - $250.

Available  $2700



“The Cresting”
Kiln-Fired 3 Dimensional Frit Glass Art Sculpture

Dimensions: 21” W, 10” H, 11” D
A Cresting Ocean Wave and the Sea below. This piece is opaque with a matt finish on the front surface with tiny sparkles from the reflection of light on the still somewhat separate individual grains of glass.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design and kiln-fired to melt together, secondarily fired onto a clear sheet of glass.

Not Available



"Queen Angelfish and Purple Tube Sponge"
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 11” W x 7.75” H x .25”
Underwater scene with yellow and blue angelfish, purple and yellow tube sponges, and a lavender and dark blue ocean floor. Iridescent fracture-patterned clear glass is layered inside to give it extra allure and sparkle. This piece is translucent with opaque design and a shiny finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design and kiln-fired during multiple firings onto 2 sheets of glass, which were then fired together.

Display Stand # 2 displays it well, and is available - sold and shipped separately.

Available $1200



“Yellow Tang”
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 9" W x 7" H x 3/8” D
Underwater scene with yellow fish, red coral, and deep blue ocean floor. . This piece is translucent with opaque design and a clear iridescent fracture-patterned matte finish on the front face.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design and kiln-fired in multiple firings onto 3 sheets of glass, which were then fired together.

Display Stand # 2 displays it well.

Not available



“Dichroic Sea”
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 10” W x 7.5”H x .25” D
Underwater scene with a yellow tang fish, purple and red corals, and turquoise undersea background - all composed of dichroic glass. On the first firing a clear layer is fired over the turquoise. The fish and corals are melted onto the background on a second firing at a lower temperature than a “full fuse,” so they can remain elevated a bit above the turquois water. This piece is opaque and has a shiny finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Pieces of dichroic glass were cut into the shapes of the design and kiln-fired onto the 2 previously fired sheets of glass.

Display Stand # 2 displays it well, and is available - sold and shipped separately.

Available $850



“Nicaraguan Sands”
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 9.25” W x 7.25”H x .25”
Sunset on Colorado Beach in Tola, Nicaragua – light glowing on the ocean and on the creek that empties into the sea, throwing the sandy beach and far-off mountain into dark silhouettes. Displays a wonderful myriad of colors in the sky. This piece is translucent with opaque design and a shiny finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the design, and kiln-fired in multiple firings onto a single coral-colored sheet of glass.

Display Stand # 2 displays it well.

Not Available



“Na Pali Cliffs, Kauai”
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 14.75” W x 10” H x .25”
Na Pali Cliffs in the Na Pali Coast State Park on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Rugged,
variegated cliffs beckon over the dark blue ocean. The sun peeks through the clouds
to shine across the water and provide a delightful mix of bright and shadowed clouds.
Colors have been layered and mottled into the design with the intention of a more
playful, impressionistic character. This piece is translucent with some opaque design
and a shiny finish on the front surface.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the
design and kiln-fired in multiple firings onto 1 sheet of glass. This glass was fired to a
lower temperature than a full fusing that would yield a totally melted flat surface. So
the frit which had been placed loosely in various thicknesses on the glass yielded an
exciting variation in texture and color.

Display Stand # 2 displays it well, and is available - sold and shipped separately.

Available $1600



"Golden Coney"    
Kiln-Fired Stand Displayed Glass Art

Dimensions: 11” x 7.75” H x .25 “ D
Underwater scene of Golden Coney fish and colorful undersea corals and creatures.
This piece is translucent with opaque designs and a clear iridescent fracture-patterned
matte finish on the front face.  Very small bubbles in a few different areas add interest
to the design.

Description of construction technique: Frit (ground glass) was manipulated into the
design and kiln-fired in multiple firings onto 2 sheets of glass, which were then fired
together.

Display Stand # 2 displays it well, and is available - sold and shipped separately.

Available $1200    


HELPFUL INFORMATION

All photographs have been only digitally watermarked with the artist’s name: M Melissa Childers. That name is definitely not written across any photograph as it might seem in the website photographs.

All works of glass art do have a small signature etched into the glass by the artist. Photographs will have a small acid-free penned signature.

All measurements of glass art are given up to the next larger 1/8” that includes the dimensions of the artwork.

 The dichroic glass used in some of this work is a special brightly colored glass developed by NASA that has the ability to display more than one color from a single piece of glass. The word dichroic derives from a Greek word meaning “two-colored.” Dichroic glass comes in a variety of colors and can be described as a color-changing glass.

The glass is coated with oxides that are vaporized by an electron beam while in a vacuum chamber, which gives it shifting colors depending on the angle of view.  It can display one transmitted color and a completely different reflected color.

The prices of these glass art pieces are determined by a multiplicity of factors that might not be immediately apparent to the first time viewer. In order to have the ability to be heated, “fused” or melted together, and cooled in a kiln, the glass must be manufactured to have the same coefficient of expansion (COE) so that it does not break or become unstable after firing. The pieces would shatter as the different types of glass cool. The variety of colors made available to the glass artist is a function of the chemicals used in their composition and is based on a constant process of research and development. Some colors use more expensive chemicals in their composition than others, so prices of the glass colors themselves vary greatly. The chemicals in some of the glass colors can react with the chemicals in some of the other colors, so extra time and care must be taken during the creative process to not allow those colors to touch.  When using ground glass or “frit” these colors cannot be simply mixed together as one would mix paints to accomplish a desired color. Reactive colors mixed together turn brownish rather than retain their original colors. Separately, the treating of some glass to take on the bright dichroic colors provides an additional expense for that glass.

The cost of the art is also a function of the time required to create a design, since the pieces of glass or ground glass must be laid down color by color, frequently on different firings so they don’t unintentionally get mixed together and alter the design. And some designs are far more complicated and labor-intensive to create than others. The frit must be laid down fairly thickly to produce the desired color or the color remains quite faint, and the thickness required can be determined by experience and frequently necessitate multiple firings. A single firing of the kiln can take from about 14 hours to several days, depending on the thickness or variability of the thickness of the glass, a time during which nothing can be added or removed from the kiln. 

A single firing can only include art pieces that will be fired to the same ultimate (or “process”) temperature because different process temperatures accomplish different results.  For example, a “full fuse” that would yield a fairly flat, totally melted together, smooth surface is accomplished at a higher temperature than the firing that allows smaller pieces of the design to remain raised a bit above the base in relief ( or ”tack fused”), or for frit to remain in impressionistic multicolored lumps of glass this artist uses to render texture and coloring in a different technique.  This mid-range temperature can also be used to “fire polish” or change a matte surface to a shiny one, and to gently round the edges of the piece. Even lower is the temperature at which a glass piece is melted or “slumped” to a particular shape over a mold. So each of these desired results require totally separate firings to different ultimate temperatures.

It is natural for bubbles to be trapped inside the glass during the firing process (the glass sheets even start with some bubbles from the sheet manufacturing process itself), and creating a glass piece across multiple firings may be part of the design plan for limiting the bubble flow. The appropriate firing schedule of times and temperatures must be carefully chosen or it can damage the art piece irreparably, thus negating all the creative time and effort.